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World News

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  • Is fake meat getting too much like the real thing?
    by Zoe Sayler for Grist on March 30, 2020 at 5:30 am

    From the bleeding Impossible Burger to ‘full-muscle’ mushroom steaks, we’ve entered the uncanny valley of meat alternativesI’ve been thinking back to just a few years ago: it was a simpler time, when, at a nice family dinner, my conservative dad could reasonably scoff at the veggie option on the menu, and I, a worldly college sophomore, could reasonably look down my nose at the menu’s meat. It was an era of balance and harmony, when animal and plant proteins fit neatly into their own categories, and God looked down on it, and it was good.Then along came the Impossible Burger, a veggie burger that bleeds, thanks to a crafty concoction of beet juice and other things. And when my college co-op ordered them in bulk, raw and frozen, my frantic attempt to cook one – why was it still pink?! – left chunks of plant goo hopelessly crusted on to a previously well-seasoned cast-iron pan. Continue reading...

  • Coronavirus live news: UK warned of six-month lockdown as New York state passes 1,000 deaths
    by Helen Sullivan on March 30, 2020 at 5:25 am

    US expert Dr Anthony Fauci says US could see 200,000 dead; Moscow announces lockdown of 12m people; Syria records first death. Follow the latest updatesCoronavirus latest: at a glanceSpain’s daily death toll rises again while Italy expects peak in a weekUS coronavirus updates – liveAustralia coronavirus updates – liveSee all our coronavirus coverage 6.25am BSTAustralian prime minister Scott Morrison has announced a AU$1,500 per fortnight “job keeper” payment to businesses. The payment, made per employee, will last for at least six months. 6.20am BSTAn Australian astrophysicist has been admitted to hospital after getting four magnets stuck up his nose in an attempt to invent a device that stops people touching their faces during the coronavirus outbreak. Related: Astrophysicist gets magnets stuck up nose while inventing coronavirus device Continue reading...

  • Coronavirus at a glance: the latest developments
    by Alison Rourke on March 30, 2020 at 5:16 am

    A summary of the biggest developments in the global coronavirus outbreakFollow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updatesKey developments in the global coronavirus outbreak today include: Continue reading...

  • As the west is in lockdown, China is slowly getting back to business | Daniel Falush
    by Daniel Falush on March 30, 2020 at 5:00 am

    After the coronavirus outbreak, life is returning to normal here. Other countries face a much longer waitCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhen China shut down its economy at the end of January to try to control the coronavirus outbreak, it was a bold and terrifying experiment. No one had tried anything similar. It was unclear whether the virus’s spread could be curbed, let alone halted. It was also possible that, as a respiratory virus with highly variable symptoms, coronavirus was simply too transmissible and too difficult to detect for these measures to work. But work they did and now China is the first nation to enter into the next phase of the pandemic – attempting to reinstate everyday life against the backdrop of coronavirus. But how much can economic life and daily freedom be restored without risking a “second wave” of the virus?Since I returned six weeks ago to my home in Shanghai from a trip to Europe, the city has progressively come back to life. First, the number of people on the streets started to increase. Then restaurants began to reopen and, slowly, filled up. As of this past week, it is no longer compulsory to wear a mask when going shopping or on public transport, and it is no longer compulsory for restaurants and shops to take the temperatures of customers, as they had been doing previously. Continue reading...

  • Looking for a distraction? Here are 25 of our favourite long reads
    by David Wolf on March 30, 2020 at 5:00 am

    If you feel like reading about something other than coronavirus – and filling some more time during lockdown – then dive into a few of these highlights from the long read archiveWhen a drilling platform is scheduled for destruction, it must go on a thousand-mile final journey to the breaker’s yard. As one rig proved when it crashed on to the rocks of a remote Scottish island, this is always a risky business Continue reading...

  • Getting Clean: 8 Initial Steps Toward Cyber Hygiene
    by Suzanne Kelly on March 26, 2020 at 12:14 pm

    This expert-driven national-security insight can’t be generated for free.  We invite you to support quality content by becoming a  Cipher Brief Level I Member .  Joining this experienced security-focused community is only $10/month (for an annual $120/yr membership). It’s a great and inexpensive way to stay ahead of the national and global security issues that impact … Continue reading "Getting Clean: 8 Initial Steps Toward Cyber Hygiene" The post Getting Clean: 8 Initial Steps Toward Cyber Hygiene appeared first on The Cipher Brief.

  • A Dangerous and Expensive Addiction to Legacy Systems
    by Suzanne Kelly on March 25, 2020 at 4:01 am

    This expert-driven national-security insight can’t be generated for free.  We invite you to support quality content by becoming a  Cipher Brief Level I Member .  Joining this experienced security-focused community is only $10/month (for an annual $120/yr membership). It’s a great and inexpensive way to stay ahead of the national and global security issues that impact … Continue reading "A Dangerous and Expensive Addiction to Legacy Systems" The post A Dangerous and Expensive Addiction to Legacy Systems appeared first on The Cipher Brief.

  • An Interview on Quantum and National Security
    by Suzanne Kelly on March 24, 2020 at 12:49 pm

    This expert-driven national-security insight can’t be generated for free.  We invite you to support quality content by becoming a  Cipher Brief Level I Member .  Joining this experienced security-focused community is only $10/month (for an annual $120/yr membership). It’s a great and inexpensive way to stay ahead of the national and global security issues that impact … Continue reading "An Interview on Quantum and National Security" The post An Interview on Quantum and National Security appeared first on The Cipher Brief.

  • Why Should I Care about Quantum Computing?
    by Suzanne Kelly on March 19, 2020 at 4:01 am

    ‘Quantum computing’ is a phrase used more frequently in national security conversations these days. What does it mean?  In its simplest definition, quantum computing involves the behavior of sub-atomic particles in computing, which translates into a fundamentally different way computers can solve problems.  Quantum computing is part of an emerging field known as Quantum Information … Continue reading "Why Should I Care about Quantum Computing?" The post Why Should I Care about Quantum Computing? appeared first on The Cipher Brief.

  • The Coronavirus Paradox
    by Suzanne Kelly on March 17, 2020 at 4:01 am

    This expert-driven national-security insight can’t be generated for free.  We invite you to support quality content by becoming a  Cipher Brief Level I Member .  Joining this experienced security-focused community is only $10/month (for an annual $120/yr membership). It’s a great and inexpensive way to stay ahead of the national and global security issues that impact … Continue reading "The Coronavirus Paradox" The post The Coronavirus Paradox appeared first on The Cipher Brief.

  • Coronavirus: The world needs to learn from the Ebola fight
    on March 30, 2020 at 5:24 am

    Liberia's ex-President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf says the world must conquer fear to deal with coronavirus.

  • What to know about the coronavirus numbers in New York
    on March 30, 2020 at 4:43 am

    The official statistics reported by health authorities would seem to show that the United States has more coronavirus infections than any other country and that the New York caseloads exceed any other state. Reporting and testing vary so much from country to country and state to state that it's hard to know the exact size of the outbreaks, and that is especially the case in New York. In the U.S., New York has about 45% of the nation's more than 125,000 cases, according to statistics posted Sunday by Johns Hopkins University researchers tracking global coronavirus trends.

  • Grandma is gone: Coronavirus keeps kids from older family
    on March 30, 2020 at 4:32 am

    A few weeks ago, Debbie Cameron saw her grandsons most days, playing the piano, making after-school snacks or singing nursery rhymes with the baby in her Chandler, Arizona, home. Cameron is 68 and has asthma, making her one of the people most at risk of getting seriously ill or dying. Now she sees her grandchildren from behind the glass of a window or a phone screen.

  • Coronavirus response highlights deepening partisan divide
    on March 30, 2020 at 4:26 am

    In Los Angeles, Mayor Eric Garcetti has instituted a shutdown on a city of nearly 4 million people and threatened uncooperative business owners with power shutoffs and arrest. In Mississippi, home to nearly 3 million people, Gov. Tate Reeves has allowed most businesses to stay open — even restaurants, so long as they serve no more than 10 people at a time. The divergent approaches are evidence that not even a global pandemic can bridge the gaping political divisions of the Trump era.

  • Kremlin Fights U.S. Sanctions, Backs Maduro in Rosneft Deal
    on March 30, 2020 at 3:00 am

    (Bloomberg) -- The Kremlin’s sudden shift of ownership of multi-billion-dollar oil projects in Venezuela shields oil giant Rosneft PJSC from further U.S. sanctions but keeps Moscow firmly behind embattled President Nicolas Maduro amid a wider stand-off with Washington.“Russia is not walking away from Maduro and will seek to thwart U.S. efforts to depose him,” said Vladimir Frolov, a former diplomat and foreign policy analyst in Moscow. “Moscow is just shielding Rosneft from sanctions which could result in a blanket embargo on all Rosneft exports.”Fears of broader sanctions have grown after the U.S. in recent months slapped restrictions on Rosneft trading companies for handling business with Venezuela. More recently, the U.S. has hinted that it might step up pressure on the Russian oil sector to reduce production. That followed Moscow’s decision early this month not to deepen output cuts agreed with OPEC led Saudi Arabia to boost output, flooding the market and pushing prices to the lowest levels in decades.The administration of President Donald Trump has already reached out to Saudi leaders to reconsider their strategy, which has battered producers in the U.S. with low prices.Read: Putin and MBS Draw Trump Into Grudge Match for Oil SupremacyRosneft late Saturday announced it’s turning over its Venezuelan projects to an unnamed state-owned company in what it called an effort to protect its shareholders’ interests. Rosneft, which produces 40% of Russian oil and 5% of world output and has substantial exposure in the western financial system, can’t afford the risk of broad U.S. sanctions that could cripple its operations. Earlier this month, a Chinese company said it wouldn’t buy crude from Rosneft because of the risks caused by the sanctions on the trading companies.“As recently as February, the Venezuelan business was profitable, which offset the sanctions risk,” said Ivan Timofeyev, an analyst at the Kremlin-founded Russian International Affairs Council. “Now the desire to avoid sanctions coincided with the need to avoid losses” after oil prices plunged, he added.The Russian giant has already cut its exposure under multi-billion-dollar prepayment deals reached several years ago. Venezuela’s oil producer PDVSA owes Rosneft only $800 million at the end of the third quarter of 2019, according to the last available data, down from $4.6 billion at the end of 2017.Sanctions ProtectionThe latest Russian maneuver mirrored its strategy in 2018 when it used Promsvzyabank to set up a new banking vehicle to serve the defense industry after state-owned weapons producers came under U.S. sanctions, thereby shielding the country’s two largest banks, government-controlled Sberbank and VTB. Unlike those big lenders, which have significant exposure to western financial institutions and thus are at risk from sweeping U.S. sanctions, the new special entity operated largely out of Washington’s reach.While Rosneft may even push to have the recently imposed sanctions on the trading units lifted, risks remain.“Rosneft is trying to stay out of the firing-line but nothing stops the Americans from finding another pretext to sanction it,” said Fyodor Lukyanov, who heads the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy, a research group in Moscow that advises the Kremlin.“Russia understands that Maduro is in an awful situation, especially with oil prices at rock bottom,” he said. “But Putin’s psychology is that you should stick with partners in difficulty.”Maduro said on state TV on Saturday evening that ”President Putin sent me a message through his ambassador reaffirming their strategic and integral support to Venezuela in all areas.”Rosneft StakeFrolov said, “Moscow thinks that Maduro is actually winning the fight with the opposition and is likely to split it to the point where he would be able to win parliamentary elections this year.” Russia has backed Maduro even as the U.S. and its allies back opposition leader Juan Guaido.For Rosneft, the deal also could give management, led by Igor Sechin, its influential chief executive, greater control, since the company is receiving 9.6% of its own shares in the transaction. That may mean the government’s share in Rosneft falls below a controlling stake, according to Andrey Polischuk, Moscow-based analyst for Raiffeisenbank.Neither the company nor the government would comment on whether the deal will bring state ownership below 50%.“Sechin gets Rosneft shares and Putin gets the chance to trade with Trump,” said Konstantin Simonov, head of the National Energy Security Fund in Moscow.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Number of coronavirus cases in Germany rises to 57,298
    on March 30, 2020 at 10:41 am

    The number of confirmed cases of coronavirus in Germany has risen to 57,298 and 455 people have died of the disease here, statistics from the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for infectious diseases showed on Monday.

  • Canada's PM Trudeau remains in isolation after wife recovers from virus
    on March 30, 2020 at 9:59 am

    Although Sophie Gregoire Trudeau received the all-clear from her physicians on Saturday, the prime minister said, and he himself has no symptoms, he had been "sharing a roof with someone who tested positive for covid-19." "I have to continue in isolation in order to be sure that we're following all the protocols and the recommendations by Health Canada," Trudeau said.

  • Germany bets on South Korean model in coronavirus fightback
    on March 30, 2020 at 9:35 am

    In the race against the coronavirus, Germany is betting on widespread testing and quarantining to break the infection chain, a strategy borrowed from South Korea whose success in slowing the outbreak has become the envy of the world.

  • 'No farewells, no ceremonies': China's Hubei cremates coronavirus dead
    on March 30, 2020 at 9:09 am

    Whatever the cause of death, China’s bereaved families have not been able to hold funerals since February 1, even as the nation’s outbreak eases, including in Hubei where the virus erupted in December. Not only are funerals banned across China, in places like Jingzhou bereaved relatives who are stuck in their homes must wait even to retrieve the remains of their loved ones.

  • Airline lets crew ditch high heels, wear pants
    on March 30, 2020 at 8:36 am

    A Japanese airline is finally letting female flight attendants wear trousers and flat shoes instead of skirts and high heels following a nationwide campaign. Japan Airlines announced that they will come into force from April 1. “This will be the first time to introduce trousers and to provide additional options for footwear,” an airline spokesperson said.

  • What Next?: Attention Slowly Turns to the Mother of All Coronavirus Questions
    on March 27, 2020 at 7:13 pm

    The fight against the coronavirus has paralyzed society and the economy. Lockdown measures are fine for the short term, but they threaten to rapidly destroy the economy and erode our existing social order. What should the next steps be?

  • German Ventilator Manufacturer: "Absolutely Mission Impossible"
    on March 27, 2020 at 5:30 pm

    Drägerwerk is a world leader in the production of ventilators. In an interview, company head Stefan Dräger, 57, discusses the challenges of keeping up with current demand as the corona crisis accelerates.

  • Calls for Corona Bonds Met with Familiar "Nein"
    on March 27, 2020 at 5:30 pm

    The danger of a new euro crisis is growing. Weak member states like Italy need help if they're going to survive the coronavirus lockdown financially. But the call for euro bonds has been met with stiff resistance -- especially from the Germans.

  • Amazon Tribes at Acute Risk from the Coronavirus - "Extremely Vulnerable"
    on March 27, 2020 at 8:38 am

    The novel coronavirus poses a deadly threat to the indigenous peoples in the Amazon rainforest. But Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro is doing nothing to protect them, says the former head of the government authority responsible for their protection.

  • Dutch Exceptionalism: Will Holland's Looser Corona Policies Pay Off?
    on March 27, 2020 at 8:14 am

    One EU country after the other is moving to restrict public life. The Dutch government has opted for less drastic measures, hoping for herd immunity and relying on the common sense of its people. But the country has still had to make adjustments to its policies.